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What You Think

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Spanner
21 October 2019 - 10:09pm
It is tragic that George and Paul may be breaking up. I hope Paul goes with George and they get a start elsewhere accessible to regular listeners. We will go with them. Thanks George for having the courage to not compromise your principles. George Moore quits MacRadio
CRG
21 October 2019 - 7:47pm
I was an avid 2UE fan and was saddened to see it's slow demise many years ago. Now with the management team decisions are we starting to see the beginning of 2GB's end? George Moore quits MacRadio
madman
21 October 2019 - 7:31pm
2SM - should grab them; they'd bring audience and credibility to weekends and compliment 2SM weekdays with Laws. George Moore quits MacRadio
madman
21 October 2019 - 7:25pm
The axe wielding starting at the top - not unusual Adam Lang departs Macquarie Media
Peter Brett
21 October 2019 - 6:03pm
I'm in Melbourne and have been streaming George and Paul for about four or five years now. Weekend morning radio in Melbourne is a cultural wasteland. I've bought stuff from 2GB's advertisers (message!). I think this is a very bad sign of the new owners' directions. It will be impossible to replace George unless it's a bland no-opinion wannabe star. A silly, silly decision may I say. And I look forward to hearing the new conditions if George does leave. I suggest 2GB will lose a lot of listeners. Maybe G&P can move to a more appreciative network. Opportunity for internet radio? George Moore quits MacRadio
Wally104
21 October 2019 - 12:34pm
What is 2GB up to? I can't understand why the executives of 2GB are trying to destroy the station. First it was the long drawn out new contract negotiations with Alan Jones which was only resolved by Chairman Russel Tate stepping in to overrule Adam Lang. Then Alan Lang gets rid of the Number 1 broadcaster for the afternoon shift Chris Smith to be replaced by the unlikeable Steve Price who cuts every talkback contributor off prematurely. Now he gets rid of George Moore from the George and Paul show on the weekends. This is the best show on Radio. I have been listening to George and Paul for 17 years and look forward to there show every weekend. Unfortunately they wrecked 2UE and now there is no alternative to listen to. I don't like the biased and politically correct ABC. If it ain't broke don't fix it. George Moore quits MacRadio
des decean
21 October 2019 - 8:48am
I am also an inductee into the hall of game and proudly the only member of the Broadcast technology area to be so Doug Mulray inducted into Commercial Radio Hall of Fame #ACRAs2019
Gemini2
20 October 2019 - 2:37pm
Silly 2gb, lost Brian Wilshire, then Chris Smith, nearly lost Alan Jones, and now George Moore

Must be having a death wish
George Moore quits MacRadio
Anthony The Koala
20 October 2019 - 1:53pm
Tuning every weekend to 2GB, I heard the announcement live on the "George and Paul Show" at 1023, 20-10-2019 from George Moore that he will no longer continue with 2GB beyond 2020.

I've been listening to the "George and Paul" show from 2002 when it was on weekend afternoons from 1200 to 1800. I used to listen to the show with my father till he passed away in 2005. It was really, and please excuse this hackneyed expression, it was a mix of "...entertainment, information, and commentary..." with diverse topics such as nostalgia, science, nature, politics, current affairs and the entertainment scene. The show changed times to 0600 to 1200 then in its final timeslot from 0900-1300 during the NRL season and 0900-1400 during the non-NRL season.

Talk shows such as the "George and Paul Show" were welcome on commercial radio because the "things" that people talk about during the week don't stop starting Saturday morning.

In addition to the topics discussed, The "George and Paul Show" was very well planned (well it did sound that way) and structured. You knew the regular politics segments were covered between 0900-1000, more political and/or economic and/or marketing discussion between 1000-1100. Let's not forget the nostalgia segment with Australian history raconteur Jim Haynes and the entertainment segments with Craig Bennett on Saturday and Roland Rocchiccioli on Sunday. Throughout the program there were single-question quizzes and the big quiz in the last half hour. The theatre of the mind plays on you with character "Dolly" the co-host of the the grand quiz.

Overall the show was slick and tight. If a guest speaker was unavailable, that guest speaker's segment was 'abandoned'. With a apologies to Booker T and the MGs, time is tight.

In regards to George Moore's departure from 2020, while "...the money they offered was good but the terms, he explained, weren't acceptable...." I won't speculate the actual reasons for George's departure. The problem with speculation is that while it is an intellectual exercise it may be wrong.

My only comment is based on the last remark that the terms of the contract were not favourable. Yes, I said before on this site that it's management's decision and they live or die on that decision. I discuss briefly a contract and the ability to leverage. I will not speculate on what happened between management and George Moore.

A contract is an agreement and the terms of a contract are agreed or disagreed. Obvious, disagree with terms and there is no contract. This is apart from the meeting of the minds and consideration (what the contracting parties exchange for the product and/or service). Forget about the standard boilerplate terms when purchasing goods and/or services. Practically, such terms are "usually" not negotiable or difficult to negotiate. It's a "...take it or leave it..." arrangement. It happens in employment contracts where the roles are of the "sausage machine" type.

However, when it comes to goods and/or services which are unique and indispensable particularly where the goods and/or services are unique and cannot be obtained or difficult to obtain elsewhere, there may be the chance that the provider of goods and/or services to have some leverage and negotiate terms in favour of the provider of goods and/or services. This is unless a 'subsitute' for the provider of goods and/or services can provide the same or greater returns.

In this case, the "George and Paul Show" produced the highest ratings whether the show was in the afternoon or morning. High ratings correspond to higher revenues to the radio station. A George Moore and Paul B Kidd team are hard to come by. It means that George Moore should have had some leverage over the unfavourable terms.

I will not speculate on whether those terms were able to be negotiated or whether there was some internal management issues in regards to the terms. That's between George Moore and management.

Thank you,
Anthony of exciting Belfield
George Moore quits MacRadio

14 October 2019 - 2:14pm
This contribution from Aaron Jowitt, of Rebel FM.

Rebel Connect is a CRA member. We were not consulted on the CRA submission and disagree with the CRA position on DRM. We have long held the view that DRM and DRM+ needs to be openly considered for commercial radio in regional and rural Australia.

Where we need to cover a lot of territory, the only realistic and commercially viable option to match an AM footprint is DRM, and we can match an FM footprint with DRM+. Efficiently achievable with a fraction of the transmitter power of the analog services, typically sharing the broadcasters existing analog sites and infrastructure, without incurring DAB+ joint venture overhead costs.

DAB+ typically can't match high power AM or FM service coverage without a network of costly SFN infills, that won't be viable in lightly populated areas. Listeners in some outer areas served now by FM may therefore never get commercial DAB+.

DAB+ in some eastern mainland regional markets is further hampered by the lack of government allocated DAB spectrum, creating significant predicted pockets of co-channel interference, despite the excellent planning efforts and extensive modeling by ACMA engineers. There will be many inter-town rural and highway coverage black spot areas occurring as a result of DAB+ transmission power restrictions and site location restrictions imposed to avoid further co-channel interference.

The interference could be alleviated by amalgamating select commercial radio markets, but unfortunately while CRA won't entertain that option, it substantially compounds the spectrum shortage problem.

Consequently numerous regional markets are proposed by the ACMA to have 8+ DAB transmitters that will cover under half the area of an existing single high power elevated FM site. In comparison, just one DRM+ transmitter could better the FM coverage from the existing FM site, so it doesn't make sense that DRM is not viable.

DAB+ is good solution for metro markets, and perhaps a dozen of the most densely populated regional markets. Beyond that, particularly in solus or duopoly commercial radio markets, DRM/DRM+ quickly stacks up as the far better and more efficient broadcast option.

There are two key surmountable DRM/DRM+ road blocks in Australia;
1. Government & ACMA need to commit to planning DRM/DRM+ on a market by market basis, and consider it for narrowcast and metro suburban radio as a potential alternative to small scale DAB+. CRA is the only sector body arguing DRM/DRM+ is not viable. Importantly, the CRA position is not unanimous across its member base. Some CRA members are concerned the current DAB+ path will hamper or even kill their digital broadcast future. There are CRA members willing to do DRM/DRM+ right now if the government adopts it as standard and mandates multi standard receivers.

2. The current lack of receivers. No receivers equals little point broadcasting. Everyday that DAB+ only radios are sold, the harder it gets. India, a market of a billion people, has sold millions of DRM/DRM+ radio's and key manufacturers are starting to ship multi-standard chips. New car radios are increasingly SDR based, where the cost of adding the DRM/DRM+ code base to a DAB+ radio is negligible. Government mandating of dual standard DRM/DRM+/DAB+ in all new digital radio sets is essential and needs to be implemented ASAP.
We don't believe DRM/DRM+ is a magic solution, but the current DAB+ only path is likely to fail in a number of small and mid size regional markets, where broadcasters are facing extensive coverage black spots, expensive SFN in-fill requirements and have co-channel interference issues to contend with. In comparison, DRM/DRM+ looks brilliant.

We have a narrowing window of opportunity for the industry and government to come together to make DRM/DRM+ an integral part of an Australia wide digital broadcast solution. It can still be done.

Aaron Jowitt, Group Engineer, Rebel FM & The Breeze
DRM not inferior but complimentary says Ruxandra Obreja

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