What You Think | radioinfo

What You Think

User Opinion Story
Fuzcapp
9 November 2018 - 1:05pm
Why does Australian radio management still do this kind of stuff? It's these sorts of things that give the radio industry an image of still being in the Stone Age. Mr. Rockhead Sylvester Nate Oscar George Slate would be proud ... Anne Stone marched out of FIVEaa
Fuzcapp
9 November 2018 - 1:01pm
As identified by Next Radio Conference research, reported here at RadioInfo [https://www.radioinfo.com.au/news/secrets-great-radio-creative] September 23, and at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omRUliKooIA ... consistency across platforms was the NUMBER ONE factor in a successful campaign involving radio.

Here it is coming up again after Ralph and co were unable to find a single Australian campaign that had that consistency.

The question must be asked - is anyone listening?
Audio advertising in need of a shake-up: IAB MeasureUp Conference
Anthony The Koala
7 November 2018 - 3:46pm
The idea of integrating seamless automatic selection between the same radio station on both FM and DAB is not new.

Kenwood Europe sell a receiver with a "Seamless FM-DAB blending" https://www.kenwood.eu/car/navigation_multimedia/multimedia/DDX4015DAB/?view=details. While such radios have been available on the market, the above story extends this to automatic blending of FM, DAB and Internet streams with extensions to voice activated control.

Whether it is the Kenwood radio or the newest development, why aren't AM stations included in the seamless blend? In Australia both AM and FM stations simulcast on DAB. They also have internet streams. So why not have seamless blending amongst the AM, FM, DAB, IP Stream modes? It would make sense if one listens to a Sydney AM station in the country (say) and other modes DAB and IP stream are not available. Then when driving in the city, the radio switches seamlessly between AM, DAB and IP stream to whichever is available and the strongest.

Car safety is very important, especially when wanting to select the radio. It is indeed a hazard if one has to go through a series of joystick maneuvers as some prestige marques when one has to concentrate on the road!

Regards
Anthony of exciting Belfield
Radioplayer unveils its prototype hybrid player
Anthony The Koala
2 November 2018 - 5:11pm
I have made comments about the low ratings that MSR, also known by the callsigns 2UE, 3EE and 4BH. Given MSR is a labour-intensive format one wonders how it will sustain economically.

Despite that, if one wants a station that comprehensively covers sport together with its companion website comprehensive with information, give it ago. There is a lot of coverage in November and the final survey 8 starts on the 4th of November and finishes on the 2nd of December.

Time will tell whether MSR's surge in comprehensive sports coverage will rate and whether the returns are profitable.

Regards
Anthony of Belfield
Macquarie Media is set for a big sporting November
addie
2 November 2018 - 2:41pm
Does this file exist?



EDITOR: Sorry, the story was migrated from our old site and the audio no longer exists on our site. Try contacting MediaHeads www.mediaheads.com.au
Christopher Reeve Remembered - FREE AUDIO
Anthony The Koala
30 October 2018 - 10:26am
Another apology. I muddled the 2nd last paragraph in my essay. It did not make sense. It should be:
"Nevertheless, the entity sponsoring a radio station must not be prospected by the radio station's officers as selling commercial time. On balance the ACMA may be correct in judging the radio station prospecting for commercials rather than sponsorship announcement."

Regards
Anthony of Belfield

Compliance essential but ACMA should not inhibit legitimate station operations: Jon Bisset
Anthony The Koala
30 October 2018 - 10:02am
Apologies. When I referred to Part 5 s9(1)(b) in my essay, I was referring to Part 5 s9(1)(b) of the Broadcast Services Act 1992 (Cth), amended in 2006.
Sorry,
Anthony of exciting Belfield
Compliance essential but ACMA should not inhibit legitimate station operations: Jon Bisset
Anthony The Koala
30 October 2018 - 9:46am
First this is not about the definition of community radio, as discussed in 2000 about a community station aspirant not awarded a licence because it was making profits either through its sponsorship announcements paid to a non-radio station entity and the selling of its CDs, reported in sources, https://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/episodes/19600/9976604 and https://www.radioinfo.com.au/news/aba-investigation-wild-fm-and-free-fm.

Rather the issue is the distinction between a commercial and sponsorship announcement. A commercial consists of a corporate entity's jingle, use of trademarks and advertising getup/imagery. A sponsorship announcement consists of the following structure: "our sponsor is 'corporate entity'....they provide a 'description of product or service', they can be contacted on phone number or www.productorservice.com.au .....'corporate entity' is a proud sponsor of 2XYZ.

It would be overstepping the line if the sponsorship announcement consisted of the following structure: Our sponsor is 'product or service', the advertisement,.....proud sponsor of 2XYZ. Similarly it would be overstepping the line if the sponsorship announcement is: "Our sponsor is 'product or service', description of the qualities of the product or service and/or its advantages over its competitors........proud sponsor of 2XYZ.

Therefore if the sponsorship announcement resembles a commercial or the qualities of a commercial, it would violate Part 5 s9(1)(b), which states "the licensee will not broadcast advertisements, and the licensee will not broadcast sponsorship announcements otherwise than as mentioned in this clause;"

So assuming that a community station is playing a complying sponsorship announcement, then the officers of the radio station who a prospecting for potential sponsors offering to air advertisements instead of sponsorship announcements is clearly misleading the potential sponsor given that what is aired is not a commercial.

Surely it would make sense that the officers of the radio station are prospecting for an appropriate sponsor for an appropriate program. For example it is ridiculous to have a sponsorship announcement for an undertaker on a dance program.

Nevertheless, the entity sponsoring a radio station must not be sold that its announcements are sponsorship announcements NOT commercial. On balance the ACMA may be correct in judging the radio station prospecting for commercials rather than sponsorship announcement.

I know this based on my experience working as a volunteer on a community radio station.

Thank you,
Anthony of exciting Belfield
Compliance essential but ACMA should not inhibit legitimate station operations: Jon Bisset
Nero
28 October 2018 - 1:47pm
Coca Cola in the US, Samsung in South Korea. Some potential 'sponsors' outside the broadcast area. Community radio should stick to the rules or pay for a commercial licence. Compliance essential but ACMA should not inhibit legitimate station operations: Jon Bisset
Bob Stuart
27 October 2018 - 12:58pm
Surely there can be no cause for complaint if a potential sponsor, located outside the Stations licence area approaches the station, without being solicited by the Station's staff. Compliance essential but ACMA should not inhibit legitimate station operations: Jon Bisset

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